Recent reading: James Clammer and Louise O’ Neill

Recently I read two fantastic books that I can’t stop thinking about, for different reasons. You may like them too!

My PhD is in White working class children in children’s fantasy fiction. These days, with the increased marketisation of publishing for children, there are fewer and fewer fantasy books featuring white working class children. Realist/ mimetic fiction does feature working class children, but they are often struggling through problems, not having adventures. So when my husband told me that his university friend James Clammer  had written a novel for young people, I had to read it.

why i went back

Image: jamesclammer.com

Aidan is a postman’s son whose mother is an in-patient in a psychiatric ward. His dad has stopped going to work, and Aidan is struggling at school. When he wakes up one morning to see his bike being stolen, that he relies on to deliver the post that his dad isn’t dealing with, he chases after the thieves. What, and who, he finds in the abandoned factory changes everything.

It is a truism that in order to write a children’s fantasy or adventure story, the author has to get rid of the parents, and Clammer does this by creating a completely realistic scenario involving the mental health of Aidan’s parents. His taking responsibility for his father and his complete awareness of what could happen to him if his dad doesn’t get back to work is very believable. The fantasy elements intruding in Aidan’s world are both funny and touching.

Only Ever Yours

Image: The Guardian

I’ve been meaning to read Only Ever Yours by Louise O’Neill for ages, but a couple of events pushed it up my TBR pile: the attacks on women’s reproductive rights in the US, the pro-choice campaign in Ireland and catching up with this archive programme from Radio 4. Like Why I Went Back, Only Ever Yours is written in the first person. It is the story of freda (all women characters’ names are written in lower case in the novel), an eve, a genetically modified girl, created to be either a companion (wife), concubine (sexual slave, without the agency of a prostitute) or a chastity (teacher and guardian to new eves).

Another truism: dystopias are always about the world they are written in. The Hunger Games was written while the US was at war and reality TV was a new medium in the days before Netflix. Only Ever Yours was written in a world of curated content, both self curated (Instagram selfies) and curated for the individual by corporations (Netflix, Amazon suggestions and social media timelines with promoted content), and the #weneeddiversebooks campaign. Diversity is dealt with brilliantly. As freda’s days at school are ended and her future will be decided by boys to whom she will be a concubine or companion, or, if entirely rejected by the boys, a chastity, she learns what her protected environment has stopped her from knowing. The ending of this book is stunning, and not at all what I was expecting from a young adult novel.

Please let me know what you think of these books if you’ve read them.

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5 thoughts on “Recent reading: James Clammer and Louise O’ Neill

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